street art

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Art Design

A 3D Zebra Stripe Crosswalk Appears in Iceland

October 23, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photos by Gusti Productions

The quiet fishing town of Ísafjörður, Iceland now has one of the snazzier pedestrian crosswalks you’re likely to encounter: a traditional set of white zebra-stripes painted to appear three dimensional. The piece was created last month as part of a collaboration between street painting firm Vegi GÍH and the city’s environmental commissioner Ralf Trylla. The city hopes the piece serves both as an artwork and as a stronger visual cue that convinces motorists to slow at the crosswalk. See more in Iceland Magazine. (via Jeroen Apers, Swissmiss)

 

 



Art

Butterfly Specimen Boxes Painted as Multi-Story Murals by Mantra

October 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Wiener Schmetterlinge, 2017. Wien, Austria.

France-based street artist Mantra has been unveiling a series of trompe l’oeil murals that convert the facades of commercial and residential buildings into larger-than-life butterfly display cases in Spain, Austria, France, and Bogota. Seen here are a few pieces from the last year, but you can explore a bit more on Facebook.
(via Lustik)

El asalto de Apollo, 2017. Saragosse, Spain.

Mariposas de Aragón, 2017. Festival Internacional de Arte Urbano. Photo by Juanjo Fernandez.

Mariposas de Aragón, progress.

Yasuni’s Imago, 2017. Thionville, France.

Bogota, 2015.

Collaboration with Stinkfish. Vienna, Austria.

 

 



Design

Yellow Street Lines Form a Park Bench Around a Tree in this Temporary Green Space by The Edible Bus Stop

October 16, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of the 2012 RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show in London, landscape and design consultancy The Edible Bus Stop conceived of a green space that incorporated gardens, artwork, and the conversion of a street into public space. The temporary exhibition titled Riot of Color was conceived as “a post apocalyptic interpretation of the after effects of the 2011 London riots.” One of the more novel aspects was this fun park bench designed as yellow street lines that rise from pavement to wrap around a tree. You can see more views on their website. (via Visual Fodder)

 

 



Art

Basketball Courts Transformed Into Large-Scale Artworks by Project Backboard

October 10, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Project Backboard began in 2014 when Daniel Peterson, a former college basketball player and employee of the Memphis Grizzlies, noticed the neglected state of several basketball courts scattered around the city. To revive these spaces, Peterson began to refurbish the courts with small improvements—filling in cracks or repainting the basic lines needed for a regulation game.

As Peterson began updating courts across Memphis, his interest widened to include ways he could not only improve his local courts, but generate excitement in surrounding neighborhoods for their public parks. After learning local artist Anthony Lee was already designing an installation for a nearby court, he partnered with the artist to paint the park’s gray asphalt with bright blue and pink designs. The collaboration marked the beginning of Project Backboard, while also inspiring Peterson work with local artists who were already engaged within a chosen community.

“I prefer to work with artists who have a connection to the park or city where we are working,” Peterson told Colossal. “Having the artist on site is very helpful for installation and, especially if it is a city I am not as familiar with, a local artist can create a work with more meaning and context. That said, there are artists I have worked with in the past that I would love to work with again if the right opportunity comes along!”

After reviving several basketball courts in Memphis, Project Backboard has moved on to produce projects in St. Louis and Los Angeles. Currently the organization is working with cities along the East Coast, specifically Baltimore and New Rochelle, New York. To explore other updated courts, and how you might be able to collaborate on an installation in your own city, visit Project Blackboard’s website or Instagram. (via Artsy and the National Endowment for the Arts)

 

 



Art

A Mountain of Nesting Heads at the Foot of the Alps by Andrea Casciu

October 3, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Andrea Casciu just finished work on this crisp new mural of nesting blue heads titled “The Soul of the Mountain” in Pinerolo, Italy as part of the Street Alps festival. He says the work is a metaphor of sorts that represents our relationship to the mountains through various “realities” we each encounter there. You can follow more of his work on Instagram. (via StreetArtNews)

 

 



Art

Banksy Unofficially Collaborates With Basquiat Outside the Barbican

September 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Just days before the opening of the first large-scale UK exhibition of artist Jean-Michel Basquiat’s work at the Barbican, Banksy stopped by in the night to put up two new murals. The first, which he refers to as a “portrait of Basquiat being welcomed by the Metropolitan Police,” depicts a figure isolated from Basquiat’s famous 1982 painting, Boy and Dog in a Johnnypump, being frisked by two police officers as a dog watches nearby. The second shows a line of customers queuing for a ride aboard a ferris wheel of Basquiat’s iconic crowns drawn in oil pastel.

Basquiat rose to fame in the late 1970s on the streets of New York as half of the graffiti duo SAMO©. Banksy’s new pieces seem to simultaneously reference the prevalence of racial profiling in targeted stop-and-frisk procedures (Basquiat sometimes referenced police brutality in his own work), while also coyly challenging the Barbican’s strict graffiti removal policy. Basquiat: Boom for Real opens September 21, 2017. (via Arrested Motion)

Photo © Patrick Nguyen, courtesy Arrested Motion.

Photo © Patrick Nguyen, courtesy Arrested Motion.

Photo © Patrick Nguyen, courtesy Arrested Motion.

 

 



Art

A Massive Mural by Ella & Pitr Depicts a Refugee Seeking Passage in France

September 13, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

All images courtesy of Galerie Le Feuvre

French duo Ella & Pitr (previously) tackle the gravity of the global refugee crisis in their latest mural, Le Naufrage de Bienvenu/The Shipwreck of Bienvenu. The massive outdoor work reaches over 47 meters (154 feet), scaling the surface of Piney’s Dam in La Valla-En Gier, Rhone-Alpes, France.

Ella & Pitr frequently highlight neglected societal groups such as the elderly and homeless by placing them on highly visible urban canvases like snowy hillsides or old airport tarmacs. Their choice of a dam―a huge aquatic blockade―could be interpreted in reference to the swelling crisis of displaced people crossing the Mediterranean from Africa.

The artists and their team spent ten days suspended from the dam to complete the painting. You can follow more of Ella & Pitr’s work on Instagram.