painting

Posts tagged
with painting



Illustration

Meet Tatsuo Horiuchi, the 77-Year-Old Artist Who ‘Paints’ Japanese Landscapes With Excel

December 4, 2017

Christopher Jobson

For over 15 years, Japanese artist Tatsuo Horiuchi has rendered the subtle details of mountains, cherry blossoms, and dense forests with the most unlikely tool: Microsoft Excel. The 77-year-old illustrator shunned the idea of paying for expensive painting supplies or even a basic drawing program for his computer, saying that he prefers Excel even over Microsoft Paint because it has “more functions and is easier to use.” Using simple vector drawing tools developed primarily for graphs and simple shapes, Horiuchi instead draws panoramic scenes of life in rural Japan.

Great Big Story recently visited Horiuchi at his home for a brief interview and a behind-the-scenes look at how he works in the video above. If you’re even slightly skeptical, here’s two of his earlier Excel artworks you can download and explore yourself:

Cherry Blossoms at Jogo Castle (2006)
Kegon Falls (2007)

You can explore more of Horiuchi’s Excel drawings on his website and at Spoon & Tamago.

 

 



Art

Towering Hyperrealistic Cactus Paintings by Lee Kwang-ho

December 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Cactus No.95, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Korean painter Kwang-ho Lee (previously) depicts larger-than-life cacti in oil paintings that stand up to 8-feet tall. Every thorn, bloom, and branch is painted with excruciating accuracy, bringing the most minute elements into hyperrealistic focus. Lee studied painting at Seoul National University and is represented by Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 1266, 2017. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 6202, 2016. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 1212, 2017. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 93, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 91, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 92, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 98, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 71, 2011. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 96, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

 

 



Art

The Monolith: Artist Gwyneth Leech Turns the Destructive Force of a New Building Into a Source of Inspiration

November 29, 2017

Christopher Jobson

NYC artist Gwyneth Leech is probably best known for her ongoing series of colorful painted cup suspensions, a project that began when she “bribed” herself with a cup of coffee in the morning on the way to her Midtown Manhattan studio, a mental trick to help overcome the nemesis of artist’s block and the drudgery of living in the city. Facing a string of personal losses, Leech was shocked to learn that the pending construction of a high-rise hotel would soon block her 13-story view of the skyline—she would also soon lose one of her primary sources of inspiration.

However, instead of moving to a new studio, Leech decided to incorporate the rising construction site into her artistic practice, painting the structure day by day as it slowly encroached outside her window. Filmmaker Angelo J. Guglielmo, Jr. deftly captures this flurry of creativity against a stark backdrop of grief. Via Ivan Kander for Short of the Week:

Proving the power of art, Leech is able to transform the pedestrian (like the coffee cups she’s famous for doodling on) into the profound. A construction site is magically transformed into a symbolic representation of one’s place in life. And, in turn, the film ends up being greater than sum of it’s parts—a short that while not the most polished visually, really grabs the viewer emotionally, without ever succumbing to saccharinity.

You can follow more of Leech’s artwork on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Sledgehammers and High Heels Find a Modern Pairing in Kelly Reemtsen’s New Paintings

November 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Painter Kelly Reemtsen (previously) paints images of anonymous women in thick impasto. The pieces juxtapose high fashion with tools and other construction equipment, placing sequenced high heels alongside sledgehammers and hefty axes. The colorfully painted works are Reemtsen’s comment on modern femininity. By placing tools in each of her subjects’ hands, the LA-based artist showcases that having feminine identification doesn’t mean fitting into a predetermined role.

Reemtsen is represented by Detroit-based David Klein Gallery and Lyndsey Ingram in London. You can view more of her fashionably dressed subjects on her website.

 

 



Art

Landscapes and Geometric Shapes Intersect in New Paintings by Mary Iverson

November 8, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Windmills, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Using a combination of oil and acrylic paint, ink, and found photographs, Seattle-based artist Mary Iverson (previously) investigates the relationship between humans and their environment in her landscape overlay paintings. Iverson builds worlds where dramatically angled, brightly colored geometric shapes are caught in webs of competing perspective lines and grids, superimposed over otherwise tranquil scenery.

Iverson described her work to Amadeus Magazine: “In following my interests and working to resolve an artistic dichotomy within myself, between my love and nature and my fascination with the shipping industry, I came upon a visual solution that metaphorically echoes what we are facing in the world today.”

These paintings are included in Correspondence, her exhibition with Scott Albrecht at Andenken Gallery in Amsterdam, NL. The show opens on November 11. You can also see more of Iverson’s finished and in-progress works on Instagram.

Fort Bourtange, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Amsterdam, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Summer Triangle, Crater Lake National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas 2017

Shipwreck, Yosemite National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas, 2017

Shipwreck, Mount Rainier National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas 2017

 

 



Art History

Watch as a 17th Century Portrait Emerges From 200 Years of Discolored Varnish

November 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Art historian, dealer, and BBC television host Philip Mould recently posted a video to his Twitter that reveals a gleaming 17th century painting hiding underneath two centuries of yellowed varnish. The protective finish is applied to protect paintings from wear, but over time will begin to discolor. In the short video Mould gently paints a solvent to remove this layer from the work’s surface, slowly brushing it away in circular strokes.

The only details known about the mysterious lady in red is from an inscription on the painting that notes she was 36 when the work was completed in 1618. You can watch Mould remove the last bits of varnish from the subject’s face in the short clip below, and follow more of his painting adventures on Twitter. (via Twisted Sifter)

 

 



Art

New Painted Mandalas Gilded with Gold Leaf by Artist Asmahan Rose Mosleh

November 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Yemeni artist Asmahan A. Mosleh (previously) continues to paint stunning acrylic mandala works infused with gold leaf accents. The meditative pieces take days to complete with upward of 80 hours spent on an individual painting. The UK-based artist shares process videos and completed works on her Instagram.