painting

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Art Illustration

A Centuries-Old Art Form Hides Within the Gilded Pages of Antique Books

July 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Martin Frost creates paintings in places that people can’t see, or can only find if they know exactly where to look. The UK-based artist is a fore-edge painter, which means he produces elaborate designs and scenes along the edges of gilded books. The works are discovered only when you fan the pages in a certain way, and become hidden by the book’s gold edges as soon it is closed. “It is a discrete painting,” Frost tells Great Big Story. “It is only there when you know how to unlock it.”

Vanishing fore-edge painting dates back to about 1660, but didn’t become popular until the 18th-century. Frost has practiced the rare art form for the last 40 years, and as far as he knows, is the last commercial fore-edge painter in the world. You can view more of his hidden paintings, in addition to a series of illuminated miniatures, on his website. (via Great Big Story)

 

 



Art

Swaths of Old-Fashioned Fabric Obscure Faces and Bodies in Unsettling Portraits by Markus Åkesson

July 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Now You See Me” (2018), oil on canvas, 180 x 140cm

In his paintings, Swedish artist Markus Åkesson depicts ornately patterned fabrics like toile, chintz, and silks wrapped around female subjects. Instead of using the old-fashioned textiles simply as signifiers of wealth and tradition, he uses the materials to take on a more sinister tone. In some of the paintings you can see expressions of sadness in the subject’s faces, while in others, the textiles completely overtake the figures beneath, obscuring their identity and emotions.

“As a child, I often sat and looked at the different patterns in textiles and tapestries,” Åkesson shares with Colossal. “I would find my own images in them, my own world, and I would dream away. For me, the pattern as a concept has a built in feeling of safety and stability, because it repeats itself over and over again. I think the use of patterns in images that depicts more melancholic or even disturbing scenes makes a interesting feeling of duality.”

The artist is represented by Galerie Da-End in Paris and VIDA Museum in Öland, Sweden, where he recently had a solo show. You can see more of Åkesson’s work on Instagram. (via I Need A Guide)

“Now You See Me (Opium)” (2018), oil on canvas, 180 x 140cm

“No One Can See You (Dysmorphia)” (2017), oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm

“No One Can See You (Dysmorphia II)” (2017), oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm

“Palmistry” (2016), oil on canvas, 100 x 120cm

“I Never Wanted You To Leave” (2016), oil on canvas, 210 x 180cm

“The Unicorn Hunt ll” (2017), oil on canvas, 200 x 170cm

 

 



Art

Lifelike Eyes Clustered Together in Striking Abstract Portraits by Emilio Villalba

July 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

San Francisco-based painter Emilio Villalba creates abstract portraits inspired by the precision of master works from the past. His paintings are set against white backgrounds that partially cover or obscure large clusters of diverse, hyperrealistic eyes, which are each painted from photographs of posed family members or friends. Villalba feels more comfortable capturing the feelings in familiar subjects’ faces rather than strangers, an element which he presents in his emotive work.

“Subtle shifts, repetition, (re)placement, or absence of facial features are attempts to create a feeling of dissonance and pressure in the viewer,” explains Villalba in an artist statement. “I want someone to be drawn in by the uncanny nature of a piece and still feel safe to explore the feelings and reactions the pressure gives rise to.”

You can see more of the artist’s paintings of eyes and other facial features on his website and Instagram.

          

 

 



Art

Towering Portraits by Ryan Hewett Mix Blocks of Bright Colors with Gestural Impasto

July 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

South African painter Ryan Hewett creates striking portraits through a Cubist lens, breaking the subject’s face and body into a amalgamation of brightly colored shapes and thickly painted marks. His impasto technique contrasts with his smoothly painted lines and surfaces, bringing a chaotic element  to the crisp edges of his figural works.

Hewett’s solo exhibition, The Garden, runs through July 22, 2018 at Unit London. You can see more of his recent paintings for this exhibition and more on his Instagram. (via INAG)

 

 



Art Food

Luminous Portraits of Sliced Fruit Glow Like Stained Glass Windows

July 6, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Rosettes Series #16, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Artist Dennis Wojtkiewicz paints enormous portraits of sliced fruit, often scaling four feet across or more. Each oil on canvas painting focuses exclusively on the edible subject, with dramatic backlit lighting seeming to light up the melons, citrus, apples, and kiwis. While Wojtkiewicz focuses on tiny details like individual segments of juice, striations, and the fuzzy skins, the realism is tempered by a slightly hazy, impressionistic finish. The artist is represented by Robert Kidd Gallery. You can see more of his paintings on his website. (via My Modern Met)

Melon Series #34, oil on canvas, 30 x 60 inches

Citrus Series #15, oil on canvas, 37 x 64 inches

Apple Series #2, oil on canvas, 48 x 50 inches

Rosettes Series #17, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Kiwi Series #4, oil on canvas, 48 x 44 inches

Rosettes Series #15, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Horn Melon Series #4, oil on canvas, 36 x 72 inches

Citrus Series #8, oil on canvas, 36 x 60 inches

Rosettes Series #13, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Citrus Series #12, oil on canvas, 27 x 72 inches

 

 



Art

Crumbling Concrete Structures Transformed Into Designer Purses by Street Artist Thrashbird

June 29, 2018

Andrew LaSane

Los Angeles-based artist Thrashbird is known primarily for stencils and paintings that blend socio-political commentary and humor, which are often done in highly visible areas like on city walls or billboards. For a recent project called “Valley Of Secret Values,” the artist ventured off the beaten path to an abandoned industrial site. Thrashbird transformed crumbling structures into replicas of high-end designer bags using paint for designs and nearby found objects like tires and wood for the handles, straps, and hardware.

While on an expedition through Lime, Oregon, the artist happened upon what used to be a power plant. “To see [the stones] crumbling with the passage of time, returning to the earth as a dust, well the metaphor was too strong to disregard,” Thrashbird told Ignant. He chose to paint the structures as handbags as “part beautification project, part cautionary tale,” drawing parallels to the destructive nature of society’s obsession with consumerism while confronting his own demons.

“We grapple for status and purpose in society, and [consume] possessions to showcase how successful we are and to fill us with purpose, with complete disregard for the people and the planet affected by our careless overconsumption,” Thrashbird said. “Our measure of success has been skewed. We’ve come to a place in society where things and social status have become more important than our connection to each other.”

You can see more of the street artist’s roving installations on Instagram. Thrashbird also offers prints and small editions of original artwork in his online store. (via Ignant)

 

 



Art

Painted Street Carpets Connect Modern Cities to Ancient Ornamentation by Arthur-Louis Ignoré

June 29, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Arthur-Louis Ignoré, also known as Ali, paints white patterned carpets on public sidewalks and passageways in cities across the world, including recent installations throughout France and Finland. The works are inspired by both geometric and botanical patterns found in ancient ornamentation from a wide range of cultural contexts. By combining the patterns into public works, he showcases the diversity found in our modern cities while providing a domestic aesthetic that contrasts the often brutalist feel of urban environments.

Currently the artist lives in Rennes, France, where a few years ago he painted his largest installation to date. The 10,000-square-foot mandala was painted on the roof of the Social Welfare Family Allowance building, and visually created links between works Ali produced in both Montreal and New York City. You can see more of his painted carpet installations on Instagram and Behance.