drawing

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Art

Ad Infinitum: Pen & Ink Drawings by Benjamin Sack Depict Infinite Cityscapes

November 30, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Benjamin Sack (previously) is fascinated by the infinite, expanses of architecture that fractalize and spiral into never ending metropolises. Skyscrapers, bridges, cupolas, and arches all packed densely together create a city that could hardly be navigated, but when viewed from above result in a sort of chaotic perfection. Sack most recently completed his third voyage aboard the MS Amsterdam as an artist-in-residence where he finds endless inspiration from various ports and cities as he works aboard the ship. He also just opened a solo show titled Ad Infinitum at Ethra Gallery in Mexico City through December. Explore more of his recent work in his portfolio.

 

 



Art Illustration

Mattias Adolfsson’s Wildly Intricate Sketchbook and Doodle Artworks

November 16, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Like a mad hybrid of Where’s Waldo meets Dr. Seuss—with healthy doses of absurdity and science fiction—Swedish illustrator Mattias Adolfsson (previously) fills his sketchbooks and canvases edge to edge with his manically dense drawings of… well, just about anything you can imagine. Around the framework of a known destination such as a small village or the interior of a church, the artist populates nearly every square inch with bands of unruly characters, Rube Goldberg-esque contraptions, and overly complex spacesuits. The purpose of everything seems to be a mystery, but the time spent trying to understand it all is always rewarding, a first-glance view can turn into minutes of exploration as each piece slowly unravels like a story.

Adolfsson is as meticulous in the documentation and sharing of his work as the subject matter itself. You can follow his process and peek inside numerous sketchbooks on his website, where you can also find many of his drawings gathered into a series of books. He also shares prints and a few original watercolor works in his Etsy shop.

 

 



Art

Monumentally Detailed Pen Drawings That Combine Real and Imagined Landscapes by Olivia Kemp

October 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

British artist Olivia Kemp creates large-scale drawings that combine observational studies made in Norway, Italy, and Scotland with fantastical places that exist only in her imagination. Her pen and ink works contain dense villages of twisting tree houses within forests and log cabins sprinkled through out private islands, each appearing isolated from modern civilization.

“I draw in order to make sense of landscape but also to construct and remodel it,” explains Kemp in her artist statement. “I build worlds and imaginary places that grow out of a need to interpret the sites that I have known, expanding and developing them across a page. This encompasses everything, from the visions of a grand landscape right down to the details of the land, the plants and creatures that may inhabit it.”

When creating her meticulous works Kemp notes that she often falls into a trance-like state, the final result surprising even herself. New works, including the 6-foot-long Archipelago, are currently on view in her solo exhibition at Browse&Darby in London through November 3, 2017. You can see more of the artist’s work on her website and Instagram. (via Hi Fructose)

 

 



Art Illustration

Graphite Illustrations That Explore the Detailed Relationships of the Natural World by Zoe Keller

October 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Zoe Keller creates detailed illustrations pulled from the natural world. Her fauna-based drawings are done completely in charcoal, drawing the eye to the subtle markings used to create either fur or scales. Source imagery for the works comes from nature and how it becomes mediated in books and field guides, however Keller often fills in areas of question with pieces pulled from her own inquisitions or memory.

“My curiosity about the natural world is what keeps me dialed in to my work,” Keller told Colossal. “Drawing is the best way that I’ve found to understand how organisms and ecosystems work. In order to draw something realistically you have to understand how it sits in space, how it moves, the mechanics of its insides. So for me tuning into the natural world means chasing an endless series of questions. On the most minute, piece-specific scale, this can mean asking how many whorls are in the shell of a particular species of snail. On a larger scale, I’ve been developing bodies of work that ask big questions about visually engaging with the natural world in ways that honor it and inspire others to protect it.”

Often the Portland-based artist’s subjects are related in a way that might not be known to the common viewer. This can range from a drawing of plants that are endangered in Oregon to a work concentrated on flowers that can only be found in a particular part of the US. This strategy allows a deeper research to go into her practice so that the final image is not just about aesthetics, but relates to a more immediate concern for the natural world.

Keller recently participated in a week-long backpacking artist residency called Signal Fire in the Klamath National Forest which was one of many inspirations for her upcoming solo exhibition Swarm, opening October 27 at Light Grey Art Lab in Minneapolis. You can peek further into Keller’s practice on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Hi-Fructose) 

 

 

 



Art Illustration

New Bic Ballpoint Pen Portraits on Vintage Maps and Stationery by Mark Powell

September 25, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Working atop faded street maps, vintage National Geographic magazine covers, and decades-old stationery, London-based artist Mark Powell (previously) draws the wrinkled contours of his subject’s faces with a standard black Bic ballpoint pen. The weathered portraits of both famous and anonymous people reflect his antiquated canvases both in texture and tone as he traces the topographies of their faces across literal street maps or paper materials that have traversed the world. Powell’s drawings have grown in both scale and detail over the years, magnifying the impact and density of each piece. You can see more of his recent work on his website where he sells a number of prints and quite a few originals. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art

Monumental Pastel Drawings of Endangered Icebergs by Zaria Forman

September 1, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

"Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4" (In progress), Soft Pastel on paper, 84" x 144", 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4″ (In progress), Soft Pastel on paper, 84″ x 144”, 2016

Zaria Forman (previously here and here) creates incredibly realistic drawings of Antarctica’s icebergs, producing large pastel works that capture the sculptural beauty of the quickly shrinking forms. This past winter, the artist had the opportunity to be side-by-side with the the towering ice shelfs, observing their magnitude aboard the National Geographic Explorer during a four week art residency.

The residency gave her the opportunity to further embody the natural formations, providing a new perspective to create her large-scale drawings.

“Many of us are intellectually aware that climate change is our greatest global challenge, and yet the problem may feel abstract, the imperiled landscapes remote,” says Forman. “I hope my drawings make Antarctica’s fragility visceral to the viewer, emulating the overpowering experience of being beside a glacier.”

Forman has a solo exhibition of her work titled Antarctica opening at Winston Wächter gallery in Seattle on September 9 and running through November 4, 2017. You can watch a timelapse of Forman completing her drawing Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4  in the video below. (via Juxtapoz)

"Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 2," Soft pastel on paper, 50" x 75", 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 2,” Soft pastel on paper, 50″ x 75″, 2016

"Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 1," Soft pastel on paper, 60" x 90", 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 60″ x 90″, 2016

"Cierva Cove, Antarctica no. 1," Soft Pastel on paper, 60" x 90", 2017

“Cierva Cove, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft Pastel on paper, 60″ x 90″, 2017

"Risting Glacier, South Georgia no. 1," Soft pastel on paper, 84" x 144", 2016

“Risting Glacier, South Georgia no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 84″ x 144″, 2016

“Lemaire Channel, Antarctica,” Soft pastel on paper, 44″ x 60″, 2015

"B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no. 1, Soft Pastel on paper," 72" x 72", 2017

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no. 1, Soft Pastel on paper,” 72″ x 72″, 2017

"B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no.2" (In progress), Soft pastel on paper, 60" x 90", 2017

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no.2″ (In progress), Soft pastel on paper, 60″ x 90”, 2017

 

 



Art

Towering Charcoal Portraits of Women by Clio Newton

August 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Swiss artist Clio Newton has been hard at work on a series of larger-than-life portraits of women portrayed entirely with compressed charcoal. The towering drawings can reach nearly 8 feet tall and capture near photographic detail of her subject’s faces, hair, and bodies. Several of the new portraits will be on view in an upcoming show at Benjamin Eck Galerie in Munich titled ‘Realism‘ that opens September 14, 2017. You can read an interview with Newton on Quiet Lunch and see more of her recent work and studio photos on Instagram. (via Supersonic Electronic, Gaks Designs)