architecture

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Photography

Architecturally-Inspired Self-Portraits by Photography Duo Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís

December 13, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Self-taught photographers Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís play out their love affair with architecture on their Instagrams @drcuerda and @anniset, posing each other amongst unique geometric elements found in buildings across Europe. The pair are both architects by trade, and met while studying at university.

“Before starting at university I used to draw everything that came into my mind,” Devís explained in a video made by Adorama. “That process was very long so I decided to change the way to express them. That’s why I came into photography. It was quicker and it also made me happy.”

Their work started off with playful photoshoots that transformed into “creativity-driven minimalistic architectural self-portraits,” which is how they classify their playful photography.

“Neither of us can hide that it is us that we both love to take pictures of the most because we appear in each others’ pictures,” Rueda told Adorama. “I think the background is sometimes even more important that the main subject in the picture, that is why buildings and architecture are so important for my photography.”

You can watch a behind-the-scenes look into the couple’s artistic process in an interview with them in this video by Adorama.

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

 

 

 



Art Design Science

Artist Philip Beesley Merges Chemistry, Artificial Intelligence, and Interactivity to Create “Living” Architecture

December 8, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Astrocyte, 2017. All images by Philip Beesley and Alex Willms / PBAI.

Multidisciplinary artist and architect Philip Beesley weaves together such a broad array of technologies and systems in his artworks that they legitimately defy description, but the immediate impact of encountering these sprawling interactive installations is visceral and awe-inspiring. His latest work, Astrocyte, connects chemistry, artificial intelligence, and an immersive soundscape to create a living piece of architecture that responds to the presence of viewers. Comprised of 300,000 individual components, the piece was on view against the industrial backdrop at Toronto’s port lands for EDIT: Expo for Design, Innovation & Technology last October. From a statement about the project:

The structure is made up of resilient, lightweight meshworks of thermally formed acrylic, laser-cut into geometrical patterns optimized for production with minimal waste. This unique space truss system is part of the Living Architecture Systems’ pioneering research into resilient and adaptable structures. Astrocyte’s structural mesh components use overlapping strands of material in doubly-curved conical forms that achieve extraordinary strength from minimal material. These innovative forms are clustered together in bundles that are similar to the multiple filaments spanning between outer and inner shells of natural bone structures.

The piece further incorporates 3D-printed lighting components and masses of custom glasswork that contain a combination of oil, inorganic chemicals, and other solutions to form a sort of chemical skin. At the core of Beesley research is the question of whether architecture can truly be “alive,” opening the possibility for self-repairing structures or deeply responsive organic environments, where artificial intelligence exists at almost every level of design. Regardless of the complexity and heady ideas, the works are deeply aesthetically intriguing, something directly out of science fiction.

Beesley is the director of the Living Architecture Systems Group and a professor at the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo. You can explore much more of his work on his website and along with several videos and interviews on Vimeo. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Design History Photography

The Wild Architecture of Soviet-Era Bus Stops Photographed by Christopher Herwig

December 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Christopher Herwig has circled the former Soviet Union, exploring the most remote areas of Georgia, Russia, and Ukraine to find and photograph its unique bus stops. After the success of his first book Soviet Bus Stops, he decided to explore the subject matter again for his new follow-up collection Soviet Bus Stops Volume II. In this book Herwig focuses on Russia rather than its former Soviet counterparts, driving nearly 10,000 miles around the massive country finding its incredibly diverse transportation shelters.

These architectural forms are more deeply explored in a forward by architecture and culture critic Owen Hatherley, who details the government policies that have allowed the bus stops to remain. You can view more of the Jordan-based photographer’s work on his website and Vimeo. (via Design You Trust)

 

 



Art Photography

Futuristic Portholes Capture the View from France’s Aging ‘Tours Aillaud’ Apartment Towers

December 5, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Series “Les Yeux des Tours” (2015 – 2017). Tours Aillaud, Nanterre, France. All images courtesy Laurent Kronental.

Eighteen towers filled with more than 1,600 apartments were built by architect Emile Aillaud between 1973 and 1981. The housing complex is found in the Pablo Picasso district of Nanterre, an inner suburb of Paris. The residential towers range from 7 to 38 floors, yet each share peculiar windows shaped like futuristic portholes. French photographer Laurent Kronental has long been fascinated by these windows and their towering hosts which serve as the subject of his 2015-2017 series Les Yeux de Tours.

Kronental shoots through these windows to capture the landscape that lies far below their sky-high positions. Many of the images in the series simply focus on the exterior view, while others include  a glimpse into the lives of residents. Curtains and bed linens hint at the owners’ aesthetic preferences, while a few photographs capture more telling objects such as pianos and dishware.

“The mundane and the magic intermesh and merge through the porthole that acts as a two-way eye, the window of a flying living room, of a spaceship galley,” explains a statement about Kronental’s series. The futuristic details built into the architecture are now elements of the past, yet their inhabitants still share the dream of a bright future. The more homely elements of their lives severely contrast the flashy design elements of the buildings’ exteriors, aging wallpaper set against the sleek skyscrapers that exist right outside.

Kronental’s work from his earlier series Souvenir d’un Futur will be exhibited in the group exhibition French Landscapes, a Photographic Experience (1984-2017) at the Bibliothèque François-Mitterrand in Paris through February 4, 2018. The exhibition includes more than 1,000 photographs from 160 artists in order to provide a diverse depiction of the French landscape as seen over the last 40 years. You can see more of Kronental’s work on his website and Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Design

A Japanese Home Designed Around a Climbable Earthquake-Proof Bookshelf

December 4, 2017

Johnny Strategy

Floor-to-ceiling bookshelves are lovely, and can act as a robust focal point in any home, though accessing the high shelves can be a problem. The common sidekick has always been ladders which can also add character and charm, but for smaller homes like in Japan they can be a nuisance, occupying too much space for not enough usage. Japanese architect Shinsuke Fujii came up with a simple, yet brilliant solution that solves another problem too: earthquake safety.

The “House in Shinyoshida,” as it’s called, named for the neighborhood in Yokohama where it stands, was conceived shortly after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake. The client, who happened to be an avid book lover, approached Fujii with the task to design a home around a large bookshelf that’s both easily accessible but also one that won’t spill all the books if there’s ever a tremor.

The solution was to slant the entire western-facing façade and create a built-in slanted bookshelf whose shelves also function as a ladder. The slant allows family members of all ages to climb up and reach books, but also keeps the books from falling should an earthquake ever shake the home. The slanted façade also has the effect of creating an open feeling in the family room, where the home’s high perch allows for plenty of sunlight to enter through the large windows. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art

Ad Infinitum: Pen & Ink Drawings by Benjamin Sack Depict Infinite Cityscapes

November 30, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Benjamin Sack (previously) is fascinated by the infinite, expanses of architecture that fractalize and spiral into never ending metropolises. Skyscrapers, bridges, cupolas, and arches all packed densely together create a city that could hardly be navigated, but when viewed from above result in a sort of chaotic perfection. Sack most recently completed his third voyage aboard the MS Amsterdam as an artist-in-residence where he finds endless inspiration from various ports and cities as he works aboard the ship. He also just opened a solo show titled Ad Infinitum at Ethra Gallery in Mexico City through December. Explore more of his recent work in his portfolio.

 

 



Art Photography

Isolated Facades Stand Precariously in the Twilight by Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

November 28, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Facades is an ongoing series by French photographer Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy (previously) which strips isolated buildings of everything but their forward-facing exteriors. In his third iteration of the project he presents the facades of small homes, boutiques, and stately mansions at dusk. The structures are lit by the last waning light of day, in addition to a few street lamps that dot the lonely roads.

Gaudrillot-Roy started the project several years ago to examine what would happen when he digitally erased the possibilities that lie behind a building’s front door. In this world, the buildings have no tenants, which prevents any secrets from lurking behind the presented brick veneers. You can see more of Gaudrillot-Roy’s facades from previous projects on his Instagram and website. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Brick Man