Art

Section



Art Design

A 3D Zebra Stripe Crosswalk Appears in Iceland

October 23, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photos by Gusti Productions

The quiet fishing town of Ísafjörður, Iceland now has one of the snazzier pedestrian crosswalks you’re likely to encounter: a traditional set of white zebra-stripes painted to appear three dimensional. The piece was created last month as part of a collaboration between street painting firm Vegi GÍH and the city’s environmental commissioner Ralf Trylla. The city hopes the piece serves both as an artwork and as a stronger visual cue that convinces motorists to slow at the crosswalk. See more in Iceland Magazine. (via Jeroen Apers, Swissmiss)

 

 



Art

A Towering Hammered Steel Lion by Selçuk Yılmaz

October 22, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Sculptor Selçuk Yılmaz (previously) recently finished work on this gigantic lion sculpture of hammered and welded metal titled Kali. The Turkish artist has mastered the ability to form the flowing mane, facial features, and bold muscular structure of various large cats from curled steel fragments. You can see many of his earlier works over on Behance.

 

 



Art

Monumentally Detailed Pen Drawings That Combine Real and Imagined Landscapes by Olivia Kemp

October 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

British artist Olivia Kemp creates large-scale drawings that combine observational studies made in Norway, Italy, and Scotland with fantastical places that exist only in her imagination. Her pen and ink works contain dense villages of twisting tree houses within forests and log cabins sprinkled through out private islands, each appearing isolated from modern civilization.

“I draw in order to make sense of landscape but also to construct and remodel it,” explains Kemp in her artist statement. “I build worlds and imaginary places that grow out of a need to interpret the sites that I have known, expanding and developing them across a page. This encompasses everything, from the visions of a grand landscape right down to the details of the land, the plants and creatures that may inhabit it.”

When creating her meticulous works Kemp notes that she often falls into a trance-like state, the final result surprising even herself. New works, including the 6-foot-long Archipelago, are currently on view in her solo exhibition at Browse&Darby in London through November 3, 2017. You can see more of the artist’s work on her website and Instagram. (via Hi Fructose)

 

 



Art Science

An 80-Foot Steel Kraken Will Create an Artificial Coral Reef Near the British Virgin Islands

October 18, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

All images via Owen Buggy

This past April a massive 80-foot steel kraken was purposefully sunk into the Caribbean Sea on top of a decorated WW2 ship. The former Navy fuel barge and its monstrous passenger were placed underwater in order to jumpstart a new coral ecosystem, while also serving as a cutting-edge education center for marine researchers and local students from the surrounding British Virgin Islands. The project is titled the BVI Art Reef, and aims to use sculptures like the porous kraken as a base to grow transplanted coral.

The Kodiak Queen, formerly a Navy fuel barge named the YO-44, was discovered by British photographer Owen Buggy approximately two and a half years ago on the island of Tortola. Instead of letting the historic vessel get picked apart for scrap metal, Buggy approached former boss Sir Richard Branson about collaborating on a restorative art installation. Together with nonprofit Unite B.V.I., artist group Secret Samurai Productions, social justice entrepreneurial group Maverick1000, and ocean education nonprofit Beneath the Waves, the project was established as both an eco-friendly art installation, and a philanthropic measure to rehabilitate native marine species.

“It’s envisioned that within just a short space of time the ship and artwork will attract a myriad of sea creatures,” said Clive Petrovic who consults on the environmental impact of the BVI Art Reef. “Everything from corals to sea sponges, sharks and turtles will live on, in, and around the wreck. The ship will become valuable for future research by scientists and local students alike.”

To sink the massive ship, the project sought the help of the Commercial Dive Services who safely submerged the vessel off the coast of the island Virgin Gorda. It was the first time the ship had been in the water for nearly 17 years, and was lead to its final resting place by a bevy of boats and helicopters.

Filmmaker Rob Sorrenti filmed both the construction and sinking of the kraken and its ship. The full-length documentary is currently in post-production, with an estimated release early next year. You can watch a clip from the upcoming film below. For information on visiting the BVI Art Reef, and to learn more about its educational programs, visit the project’s website and Facebook.

 

 



Art Crafts Design

An Exquisite Collection of Paper Pop-Ups Designed by Peter Dahmen

October 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

From commercial packaging to artistic creations fused with geometry, paper designer Peter Dahmen is a true master of the pop-up. This new video titled Most Satisfying Video of Pop-Up Cards is a portfolio of sorts spanning the last several years of his work engineering elaborate objects that unfold from the pages of books or the confines of tiny boxes. You can go behind the scenes a bit more in this 2014 film on Dahmen from Christopher Helkey, and you can also try building some of his original designs with these free online tutorials. (via The Kid Should See This)

 

 



Art

Butterfly Specimen Boxes Painted as Multi-Story Murals by Mantra

October 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Wiener Schmetterlinge, 2017. Wien, Austria.

France-based street artist Mantra has been unveiling a series of trompe l’oeil murals that convert the facades of commercial and residential buildings into larger-than-life butterfly display cases in Spain, Austria, France, and Bogota. Seen here are a few pieces from the last year, but you can explore a bit more on Facebook.
(via Lustik)

El asalto de Apollo, 2017. Saragosse, Spain.

Mariposas de Aragón, 2017. Festival Internacional de Arte Urbano. Photo by Juanjo Fernandez.

Mariposas de Aragón, progress.

Yasuni’s Imago, 2017. Thionville, France.

Bogota, 2015.

Collaboration with Stinkfish. Vienna, Austria.

 

 



Art

Vibrant Sunsets Hover Inside Abandoned Scottish Castles and Homes by Andrew McIntosh

October 17, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Scottish painter Andrew McIntosh (previously) paints bridges, castles, and forgotten homes, repurposing the structures’ windows and arches as vibrant portals into another world. The deep red and orange sunsets found in these negative spaces serve as the heart of each work, which each cast an intense glow into the surrounding desolate landscapes. The works are centered around scenes found in his native Scotland, areas that don’t necessarily illicit awe or intrigue from the average viewer.

“McIntosh is drawn to the plain and ordinary – a Victorian lodge, a simple tower house, or an unremarkable castle set in scenery that is not immediately picturesque or inspiring – subjects that wouldn’t usually attract an artist’s attention,” writes Dr. Richard Davey in an essay about McIntosh’s paintings. “They are born from deep knowledge of the land, painted by an artist who wants to probe the limits of landscape painting, who knows that nature is much quieter than it is more usually portrayed, and that capturing the undramatic, ordinariness of nature, is more difficult than it may seem.”

The confined sunsets serve as secretive elements of power to each crumbling form of architecture. McIntosh intends for these private moments to remind the viewer of everyday wonder, and to search for these moments during the mundane aspects of the day-to-day. The painter has an upcoming solo exhibition of his work at Beaux Arts London opening October 19 and running through November 18, 2017.