Art

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Art

‘Salt Years,’ Explores Sigalit Landau’s Lifetime Relationship With the Dead Sea

December 14, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Israeli artist Sigalit Landau (previously) has a practice that is deeply tied to working with the Dead Sea. Landau uses the hypersaline body of water as both a photographic backdrop and medium to suspend everyday objects, creating densely salt-encrusted sculptures. The items she chooses for her pieces are sometimes simply based on their textures and shapes, while others are chosen in order to filter memories that have been passed down to the artist through her parents and grandparents.

“These objects leave ‘the game’ of being useful ‘things’ and enter a new realm – the open space of representation,” said Landau to Colossal. “They loose their old features and dimensions and inhale a certain pureness of spirit, treated by climate and enhanced by emotion.”

A new book titled Salt Years, explores Landau’s process, bringing a new perspective to her salt crystal sculptures, video art, and images created over the last 15 years. Within the book Landau explores her process of “baptizing” objects in the Dead Sea’s waters, showcasing how the salt-filled sea breathes new life into the inanimate works through behind-the-scenes photos, and personal notes and essays.

You can pre-order the 288-page book through Landau’s Indiegogo campaign, and follow its progress through the book’s Facebook.

 

 



Art

Fence and Border Interventions by Icy and Sot

December 14, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Responding to issues of border control and the refugee crisis, Iranian artist duo Icy and Sot (previously) created a variety of fence and border interventions. The Brooklyn-based brothers most recently installed a piece outside The Lot Radio in New York, and exhibited several new artworks with Thinkspace Art Gallery for a show tited Human (Nature). You can see more current work here.

 

 



Art

Guerilla Flower Installations on the Streets of NYC by Lewis Miller Design

December 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

For the last few months New Yorkers have been treated to an unexpected sight during their daily commutes as random trash cans around the city have been converted into overflowing bouquets of colorful flowers. The temporary installations dubbed “Flower Flashes” are the idea of floral designer Lewis Miller Design who utilize a mixture of post-event flowers and fresh stock to create the displays on street corners or around statues, reminding us somewhat of Geoffroy Mottart’s installations in Brussels. You can see more of Lewis Miller’s work on Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art

Wearable Glass Objects and Sculptures by Kit Paulson

December 12, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Kit Paulson has a broad interest in art, science, and history that intersects superbly in her career as a glass sculptor. Over the past several years she’s explored human anatomy through a variety of skull and bones pieces, as well as wearable objects like masks, armor, and even a pair of gloves. Paulson is currently finishing an MFA at Southern Illinois University and will be teaching upcoming workshops at Pittsburgh Glass Center, Bildwerk Frauenau, and Pilchuck Glass School. You can follow her most recent work on Instagram. (via Corning Museum of Glass)

 

 



Art Food

Donut Worry Be Happy: Pop Culture References on Expertly Glazed Ceramic Donuts by Jae Yong Kim

December 11, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

South Korean ceramicist Jae Yong Kim creates deliciously glazed donuts out of clay, glitter, and swarovski crystals. The faux desserts present a glossy perfection in their paint application, yet contain an irregularity in shape to trick the eye into believing they might be an edible treat.

Kim chooses patterns and images that evoke a sense of pop culture both past and present, with several pieces imitating the style of famous painters such as the splattered marks of Jackson Pollack or concentric dots of Yayoi Kusama. These references, alongside their presentation as food, ask the audience to consider what they are really consuming when viewing his small, spherical works.

“Without my intention, references to Pop Art have been a consistent occurrence throughout the entirety of the donut artworks,” said Kim in a statement. “Questioning myself regarding the donuts falling in line with a specific genre has brought questions and need for understanding. Each individual donut has invariably read to me as a small painting; color, pattern and physicality have been the ultimate procedure for my personal expression.”

Kim is a graduate of the Hartford Art School and Cranbrook Academy of Art. Kim splits his time between Korea and New York, and works form a studio in Jersey City, NJ. You can see more of his donut-based paintings on his Instagram, and take a look at previous ceramic works on his website. (via Design Milk)

 

 



Art Photography

Everyday Objects Obsessively Organized into Patterns by Adam Hillman

December 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

New Jersey-based “object arranger” Adam Hillman has really stepped up his organization efforts the last few months, pushing his precisely organized patterns of everyday objects into increasingly more complicated designs. Everything from breakfast cereal to office supplies finds its place in these tightly controlled symmetrical layouts that take hours to measure, cut, and arrange. Hillman now shares some of his best work as prints and you can follow him on Instagram.

 

 



Art Design Science

Artist Philip Beesley Merges Chemistry, Artificial Intelligence, and Interactivity to Create “Living” Architecture

December 8, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Astrocyte, 2017. All images by Philip Beesley and Alex Willms / PBAI.

Multidisciplinary artist and architect Philip Beesley weaves together such a broad array of technologies and systems in his artworks that they legitimately defy description, but the immediate impact of encountering these sprawling interactive installations is visceral and awe-inspiring. His latest work, Astrocyte, connects chemistry, artificial intelligence, and an immersive soundscape to create a living piece of architecture that responds to the presence of viewers. Comprised of 300,000 individual components, the piece was on view against the industrial backdrop at Toronto’s port lands for EDIT: Expo for Design, Innovation & Technology last October. From a statement about the project:

The structure is made up of resilient, lightweight meshworks of thermally formed acrylic, laser-cut into geometrical patterns optimized for production with minimal waste. This unique space truss system is part of the Living Architecture Systems’ pioneering research into resilient and adaptable structures. Astrocyte’s structural mesh components use overlapping strands of material in doubly-curved conical forms that achieve extraordinary strength from minimal material. These innovative forms are clustered together in bundles that are similar to the multiple filaments spanning between outer and inner shells of natural bone structures.

The piece further incorporates 3D-printed lighting components and masses of custom glasswork that contain a combination of oil, inorganic chemicals, and other solutions to form a sort of chemical skin. At the core of Beesley research is the question of whether architecture can truly be “alive,” opening the possibility for self-repairing structures or deeply responsive organic environments, where artificial intelligence exists at almost every level of design. Regardless of the complexity and heady ideas, the works are deeply aesthetically intriguing, something directly out of science fiction.

Beesley is the director of the Living Architecture Systems Group and a professor at the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo. You can explore much more of his work on his website and along with several videos and interviews on Vimeo. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 

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