Design

3D-Printed Legos Snap Into Place in Hintlab’s Line of Playful Rings and Earrings

November 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Paris-based design duo Hintlab amplifies the nostalgia tied to Lego bricks by bringing the classic children’s toy to an older audience. Their line of earrings and rings are made to house small, interchangeable bricks, allowing their customers to customize their look depending on their mood or whim. Each piece of jewelry comes with a set of ten 3D-printed objects that can be either worn as a singular setting or stacked to create a multi-layer work.

Hintlab has also developed a line of jewelry that fits flush in its setting. The color and shape of the flat bricks still reflect the feeling of Lego, but are housed in a more minimal package. You can buy your own interchangeable set on the group’s Etsy, and see past designs on their Instagram. (via Designboom)

 

 



Art Photography

New Finnish Landscapes Captured Within Jars by Christoffer Relander

November 17, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Christoffer Relander (previously) uses double exposure photography to “capture” wooded Finnish landscapes inside of glass jars. These images give a peek into the photographer’s past, while also metaphorically preserving the memories he formed as a childhood growing up in the south of Finland.

“Reality can be beautiful, but the surreal often absorbs me,” said Relander in an artist statement on his website. “Photography to me is a way to express and stimulate my imagination. Nature is simply the world. With alternative and experimental camera techniques I am able to create artworks that otherwise only would be possible through painting or digital manipulation in an external software.”

The new series is a follow-up to his black and white project Jarred & Displaced which was recently exhibited at the Finnish Cultural Institute in Madrid. You can view more of Relander’s wooded images on his Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Art

Bordalo II Opens the Doors to ‘Attero,’ a Giant Exhibition of Animal Assemblages Built with Trash

November 17, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Within the confines of an abandoned warehouse in Lisbon, artist Bordalo II just opened the doors to his largest body of work to date, dozens of animalistic assemblages comprised of his trademark medium: trash. Using locally-sourced waste plastics, car parts, construction materials, and other found detritus, Bordalo has become famous for his uncanny depictions of animals—those most vulnerable to the side effects of our disposable economy. While scale often plays a large role in his outdoor wall-mounted street pieces, the artist also created considerably smaller assemblages attached to old doors, siding, and windowpanes.

“Whether on a large or small scale, his unusual sculptural creations oblige us to question and rethink our own role as actors in this static, consumerist and self-destructive society, which exploits, often in an abusive way, the resources that nature offers us,” shares Attero curator Lara Seixo Rodrigues.

With well over 8,000 visitors in its first week, Attero (Latin for waste) opened on November 4, 2017 and runs through November 26. You can see many more photos on Facebook and Instagram.

 

 



Colossal

Join Colossal and DonorsChoose.org in Filling Classrooms in Need with Art Supplies

November 16, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Whether you’re an established professional working with a top gallery, a weekend tinkerer, or a student tackling personal projects, here at Colossal we believe that your creativity enriches our world. The incredible range of art created by artists of all ages, from all backgrounds, all over the planet, is the lifeblood of our publication. That’s why, in this season of giving and receiving, Colossal is excited to partner with DonorsChoose.org to help support young artists.

DonorsChoose.org is a New York-based nonprofit that makes it easy for anyone to help a classroom in need. Public school teachers from every corner of America create classroom project requests, and you can give any amount to the project that inspires you. 

We’ve selected a range of art-focused projects from around the U.S., including requests for basic art supplies as well as specific needs for exploring particular techniques and materials. Each project page lets you know about the teacher and students who benefit from our collective support; how and why the supplies will be used; and includes a specific breakdown of every item and expense on the classroom’s wish list. Or, simply make a donation at the top of the page and your donation will be automatically distributed.

Why do today’s students need our support? While many students in the US are fortunate to receive arts education, 17% of elementary school students receive no instruction in visual arts, and 96% of students receive no instruction in theater. And schools with higher rates of students in poverty are less likely to provide arts education (source). Youth of color in the United States are also half as likely as their white peers to be given access to arts education, a gap that has worsened over the last three decades (source).

So, is this also a question of policy? Absolutely, and we encourage you to drop a postcard in the mail or make a phone call to your elected representatives. DonorsChoose.org is helping public school teachers close the gap for their students by connecting educators and communities. We’ll be adding new projects and keeping a running tally of the total amount we’re raising as a community on our Colossal x DonorsChoose.org Page. Together, we can help tomorrow’s artists today.

 

 



Art Illustration

Mattias Adolfsson’s Wildly Intricate Sketchbook and Doodle Artworks

November 16, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Like a mad hybrid of Where’s Waldo meets Dr. Seuss—with healthy doses of absurdity and science fiction—Swedish illustrator Mattias Adolfsson (previously) fills his sketchbooks and canvases edge to edge with his manically dense drawings of… well, just about anything you can imagine. Around the framework of a known destination such as a small village or the interior of a church, the artist populates nearly every square inch with bands of unruly characters, Rube Goldberg-esque contraptions, and overly complex spacesuits. The purpose of everything seems to be a mystery, but the time spent trying to understand it all is always rewarding, a first-glance view can turn into minutes of exploration as each piece slowly unravels like a story.

Adolfsson is as meticulous in the documentation and sharing of his work as the subject matter itself. You can follow his process and peek inside numerous sketchbooks on his website, where you can also find many of his drawings gathered into a series of books. He also shares prints and a few original watercolor works in his Etsy shop.

 

 



Amazing Photography Science

Matereality: A Mesmerizing Short Film of Macro Magnetism Captured by Roman De Giuli

November 16, 2017

Christopher Jobson

In this mesmerizing new short film, German filmmaker Roman De Giuli worked with magnets, iron filings, reflective pigment, and glitter to create this pulsing visual montage of magnetic special effects titled Matereality. It’s amazing to think this was all done with practical effects and not CGI. Music by Son-J. (via The Awesomer)

 

 



Photography

Nighttime City Scenes Bathed in Neon by Photographer Elsa Bleda

November 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Elsa Bleda captures hazy moments that linger on the outskirts of the cities she visits in Eastern Europe and South Africa. Bleda is drawn to nighttime scenes bathed in colored light, such as a flock of pigeons illuminated by pink neon, or a lone gas station emitting an eerie blue glow. The images she chooses to shoot also have a limited human presence, which gives a dystopian feeling to the work’s empty streets and snow-covered buildings.

Previously, Bleda has presented exhibitions showcasing images she has taken in Johannesburg and Cape Town. Her upcoming solo exhibition with Red Bull will take a look at Durban, South Africa. You can view a preview of her exhibition alongside a list of songs the photographer chose to fit the mood of each work on Redbull’s website. More of her night-based images of South Africa and Istanbul can be found on her Facebook, Instagram, and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)